Siesta

Two weeks of examinations.

They ended today.

Strenuous, exhausting, killing, agonizing – the feelings felt by my fellow classmates and I cannot take apt expression in words.

We’ve turned into animals, at least those of us that like to take it the Bill Gates way and leave all the studying for the weekend before.

Anybody who has been through schooling can probably understand this while simultaneously cringing – there’s two kinds of people you find on the day exams get over – the kind that goes out with friends and parties, and then there’s my kind.

The bus ride home today was a remarkable test of my patience, and much like these exams, I nearly failed it (jokes- I don’t fail). To put it in perspective, during the bus ride home on a normal day, I like to sit alone and think. I could do that for hours. The bus drives past the same places, same sights, but different faces. There’s always something new to look at, some detail I had missed before, the sadness on someone’s face, the antithesis on another’s. But it’s funny how all of that changes on the last day of exams. No more poetic, profound thoughts, the only thing you think of is sleep.

You just want to go home, set up your abode for the next 30 hours in the sofa, get the set of movies you thought of watching, but obviously couldn’t, during the three weeks of sheer hell.

Your decision making skills are really put to the test when it comes to deciding whether you want to spend your first twelve hours of freedom sleeping, or watching television. Or you could do both.

It’s amazing how just a couple of weeks of exams can make people like me so materialistic, but then again the question of whether the materialism is justified comes to the forefront.

Two weeks of examinations.

They ended today.

Strenuous, exhausting, killing, agonizing – the feelings felt by my fellow classmates and I cannot take apt expression in words.

We’ve turned into animals, at least those of us that like to take it the Bill Gates way and leave all the studying for the weekend before.

Anybody who has been through schooling can probably understand this while simultaneously cringing – there’s two kinds of people you find on the day exams get over – the kind that goes out with friends and parties, and then there’s my kind.

The bus ride home today was a remarkable test of my patience, and much like these exams, I nearly failed it (jokes- I don’t fail). To put it in perspective, during the bus ride home on a normal day, I like to sit alone and think. I could do that for hours. The bus drives past the same places, same sights, but different faces. There’s always something new to look at, some detail I had missed before, the sadness on someone’s face, the antithesis on another’s. But it’s funny how all of that changes on the last day of exams. No more poetic, profound thoughts, the only thing you think of is sleep.

You just want to go home, set up your abode for the next 30 hours in the sofa, get the set of movies you thought of watching, but obviously couldn’t, during the three weeks of sheer hell.

Your decision making skills are really put to the test when it comes to deciding whether you want to spend your first twelve hours of freedom sleeping, or watching television. Or you could do both.

It’s amazing how just a couple of weeks of exams can make people like me so materialistic, but then again the question of whether the materialism is justified comes to the forefront.

It’s just the absence of sleep.

Two weeks of examinations.

They ended today.

Strenuous, exhausting, killing, agonizing – the feelings felt by my fellow classmates and I cannot take apt expression in words.

We’ve turned into animals, at least those of us that like to take it the Bill Gates way and leave all the studying for the weekend before.

Anybody who has been through schooling can probably understand this while simultaneously cringing – there’s two kinds of people you find on the day exams get over – the kind that goes out with friends and parties, and then there’s my kind.

The bus ride home today was a remarkable test of my patience, and much like these exams, I nearly failed it (jokes- I don’t fail). To put it in perspective, during the bus ride home on a normal day, I like to sit alone and think. I could do that for hours. The bus drives past the same places, same sights, but different faces. There’s always something new to look at, some detail I had missed before, the sadness on someone’s face, the antithesis on another’s. But it’s funny how all of that changes on the last day of exams. No more poetic, profound thoughts, the only thing you think of is sleep.

You just want to go home, set up your abode for the next 30 hours in the sofa, get the set of movies you thought of watching, but obviously couldn’t, during the three weeks of sheer hell.

Your decision making skills are really put to the test when it comes to deciding whether you want to spend your first twelve hours of freedom sleeping, or watching television. Or you could do both.

It’s amazing how just a couple of weeks of exams can make people like me so materialistic, but then again the question of whether the materialism is justified comes to the forefront.

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